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30 Oct 2014

What is Impact Milling?

Posted By Ross Nunweiler

What is Impact Milling?

Over our 25 years in milling whole grain flour we have been asked “What is impact milling and why don’t you stone grind your grains?” The answer is simple . . . that impact milling, we think, produces a much superior flour than either commercial roller mills or stone grinding operations.

Impact milling consists of small steel “hammers” rotating at a high speed in an enclosed chamber. These “hammers” strike the whole grain in mid-air with such an “impact” that the grain is immediately shattered into flour. There is no friction from heat-creating stones or rollers.

Temperature is the key factor here. Our impact mill maintains a low temperature of about 60 degrees F/15 degrees C in the cooler months and up to about 90 degrees F/30 degrees C in the summer. These cool temperatures are important as high heat damages vital nutrients within whole grains. The wheat bran is an insoluble fibre that passes through the body and helps to sweep harmful substances out of the body. Fibre plays a significant role in preventing heart disease and cancer. The germ is a powerhouse of vitamins and minerals such as Vitamin E, Folic Acid, Iron and Zinc to name a few. Impact Milling preserves these qualities in the flour allowing us to deliver fresh flour with a good stable shelf life to our customers.

Other methods like stone and rollers typically create higher heat than impact milling. This higher heat is created by friction from the stones or rollers that can destroy nutrients in whole grain flour along with making the shelf life unstable. The flour will therefore become rancid more quickly. It is important to store flour in a ‘cool’ dark place. Improper storage will shorten the shelf life of flour as well.

Impact milling might not seem as nostalgic as stone milling, but it none the less produces an excellent whole grain flour, efficiently and nutritionally . . . simply natural!


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26 Sep 2014

The Gluten-Free Craze … Just a Faze?

Posted By Ross Nunweiler

The Gluten-Free Craze … Just a Faze?

Not to Celiacs. According to the Canadian Celiac Association ‘although statistics are not readily available, it is estimated that 1 in 133 persons in Canada are affected by Celiac Disease’. At Nunweiler’s Flour Co. we take this very seriously and strive to always ensure that our customers are aware we are a ‘wheat’ milling facility.

For those of us who aren’t Celiac there are a percentage, no doubt, that are ‘wheat sensitive’. This range includes those that are diagnosed and those that are self-diagnosed. Let’s start with those that are diagnosed:

There are wheat grains that are low in gluten strength and can be tolerated by some wheat sensitive people. Spelt and Kamut are ancient grains and Red Fife is a landrace heritage grain. What makes these grains more tolerable is their history. They haven’t been hybridized, GMO’d or altered in any way in a lab and typically have been grown organically. They are the way they’ve always been – in their natural state and we believe this plays a role in their tolerance by wheat sensitive individuals.

For those who think they may have a ‘gluten sensitivity’ but really don’t know …first you should consider your diet and be honest with yourself. Look at all the foods you eat and consider how much is made from white flour (this includes refined whole wheat flour). Unless you are only eating WHOLE GRAIN flour you are ingesting an increased amount of gluten. White flour 100% starch and protein = high gluten. WHOLE GRAIN flour is approx 84% (starch & protein). Remaining is Bran 13% and Germ 3% (why white bread rises higher than whole grain bread).

See, you don’t have to give up your ‘daily bread’ (or toast, sandwich and so on). Try an ORGANIC WHOLE GRAIN flour with lower gluten strength so you don’t miss out on all the goodness Nature intended for you.

If you are wheat sensitive be sure to consult with your Doctor before trying these suggested grains.

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19 Sep 2014

Why Organic?

Posted By Ross Nunweiler

Why Organic?

If you aren’t sure – just google ‘Why ORGANIC?’ and you’ll find over 298,000,000 results packed with reasons, studies, testimonials and so on. There is no doubt that organic food is better for us, enough research proves it let alone the fact that organic food just tastes better. Still it is hard to justify the price difference sometimes. Let’s take a look at this.

A slice of non-organic white bread may cost half or even less than half of a slice of WHOLE GRAIN wheat bread but are we comparing apples to apples? Absolutely not. The nutritional value in WHOLE GRAIN wheat bread is far superior to white bread. Ok, yes there are nutrients in white bread – but they are chemically added back (and by law only 5 of the approx 30 have to be added back in) and what about the micro-nutrients? – nowhere to be found in white bread. In whole grain – they never left. We believe nature put them there for a reason – for us to eat!

Fibre is the big deal here though – approx 8 times the amount of fibre. Studies have shown that a diet high in fibre can help reduce your risk of heart disease and bowel trouble. This is why it’s easy to eat a stack of white pancakes or toast but with whole grain you feel full after one or two. So while the calories may be lower for the piece of white bread – chances are you are going to eat more because it won’t fill you up.

So in the end you may pay a bit more for that slice of whole grain bread but dollar for dollar you are getting much more for your monies worth. Your body will thank you!